Rachel Grice

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Participant: PROMISE AGEP Research Symposium

Rachel Grice
Department
: Information Systems
Institution: University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)

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ABSTRACT

Barriers to Mobile Technology Adoption for the Management of Medications in Patients with Cardiovascular Disease 

This research examines barriers for cardiovascular disease patients in using technology to manage their medications. By utilizing an exploratory multiple case study design methodology, this examination will bring to light: 1) the root of the cardiac patient population’s medication non-compliance, and 2) perceived barriers to adopting mobile technology to manage their medications.  Four English-speaking patients from the ages of 54 to 70 with cardiovascular disease (CVD) at the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC) agreed to participate in a semi-structured interview.  After the interviews were transcribed, quotations from the text were coded and themes that ran throughout the text were identified.  After thorough review of all cases, summary and comparative analysis of the four cases provided a rich description and level of analytic generalizability to the cardiac population.  The data gathered from this current study suggest that the only barrier existing here is that the patients do not want to use a technology for the purpose of medication adherence.   Future directions would probe at using a mobile technology to manage a patient’s disease, not their medication, as suggested by the participants.

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH

Rachel Grice earned her Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology and a minor in Neuroscience from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2009. She received her Master of Science degree in Human Centered Computing in 2014 from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). She is currently in the doctoral program in Human Centered Computing at UMBC.

Rachel has been the recipient of numerous honors including the NSF Bridge to the Doctorate Fellowship in 2014. While pursuing her degree, Rachel volunteers as a researcher at the University of Maryland, Baltimore in the School of Medicine. She has assisted with research in their Cardiology program since 2010.

Rachel has presented her research at conference meetings and workshops including the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society (HFES) Healthcare Symposium (April 2015). Additionally, Rachel has given various presentations in the realm of cardiovascular medicine, neuroscience, and human factors.

Rachel’s dissertation research is supervised by Dr. Ant Ozok.

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GENERAL SUMMARY OF GRADUATE RESEARCH

Rachel is interested in how we can harness the powers of technology to improve healthcare.  Specifically, she is interested in using technology in the arenas of cardiovascular disease, disease management, and reducing medical errors.  Currently, she is working on technology for medication management in heart disease patients, and in the past has worked on various clinical research trials for heart disease.  Other research projects she has worked on were developing a mobile application for people with cognitive disabilities, developing robotic prototypes, and testing the effects of redesigning websites and other items of everyday use. Future research will involve looking at redesigning systems and processes, keeping in mind human factors design principles, for medical applications.

SELECTED LIST OF PRESENTATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS

  1. Grice, R., Ozok, A. A., Miller, M. (2014): The Role of Technology in Home-based Medication Adherence for Preventive Cardiac Self-Care: A Human Factors and Usability Perspective. Accepted for publication in the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Health Care Conference proceedings, Baltimore, MD, April 26-29, 2015.
  2. Miller, M., DiNicolatonio, J., Can, B., Grice, R., Damoulakis, A., and Serebruany, V. The Effects of Ezetimibe/Simvastatin versus Simvastatin Monotherapy on Platelet and Inflammatory Biomarkers in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome. Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Md., and HeartDrug™ Research Laboratories, Johns Hopkins University, Towson, Md., USA Cardiology 2013; 125:74-77.
  3. Mumtaz, A., Grice, R., Saunders, E., Johnson, W., and Miller, M. (August 2014). Assessment of Drug Therapy, AMG 145, in Patients with Clinically Evident Cardiovascular Disease. University of Maryland School of Medicine Student Research Forum. Baltimore, MD.
  4. Mohan, G., Knopp, R., Capili, A., Stone, M., Meyerhoff, J., and Lumley, L. (November 2010). Social stress increases dendritic spine density in the amygdala and decreases dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of male mice. Society for Neuroscience Conference. San Diego, CA.
  5. Mohan, G., Knopp, R., Capili, A., Stone, M., Meyerhoff, J., and Lumley, L. (July 2010). Social stress alters dendritic spine density in the amygdala and prefrontal cortex of male mice. Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology Conference. Toronto, Canada.

Disclaimer: Information on this page has been provided by and is owned by the student presenter.

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